Archive for the ‘ Events ’ Category

Party’s On at our Mount Joy Branch


We hope to see you at our celebration event. Mark your calendars now.

grand-opening-remindersnip-grand-opening-specials

Shrewsbury Branch Grand Opening Event Slated for Saturday


We hope to see you at our celebration event on Saturday!

shrewsbury grand opening main graphicGrand Opening graphicenter to win PSU tixfind us

Shrewsbury Branch Opens August 15


We’re opening our 60th branch location on Monday, August 15 in Shrewsbury. This new branch is our 9th location in York County. Stop by to visit. Check out our special offers.

shrewbury main graphicGrand Opening graphic

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We hope to see you there.

 

Join us at this upcoming event at our Hanover Branches!


You’re invited! Stop by our Hanover Branches for these special events! The community is welcome to attend.

Hanover Event(s)

Click here for details about our North Hanover Branch. Click here for information about our South Hanover Branch.

Don’t Miss Family Fun Day at Our Camp Hill Branch!


Don’t miss this free family friendly event at our Camp Hill Branch! The community is welcome to attend.

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Click here for details about our Camp Hill Branch.

Catch the Save Wave™ During National Credit Union Youth Week!


National Credit Union Youth Week

National Credit Union Youth Week

It’s National Credit Union Youth Week! Now through Saturday (4/26), we’ll be helping our youth members Catch the Save Wave™ so they understand the importance of saving, managing money, and having a good relationship with their credit union.

Children can learn money skills as early as age three! Here are just a few tips to help young credit union surfer savers Catch the Save Wave™:

  • Have young children (preschool age) sort different types of money into piles by color and size.
  • Play grocery store or credit union/bank. Help them use a pretend cash register.
  • At the grocery store, let youth of all ages help you shop. Teach them how to comparison shop. For example, show them that for every $4.85 box of cereal, there may be similar brands on sale for half as much.
  • As youth get older, let them know what things cost. Share sales receipts for items you’ve purchased for them and for bills you’ve paid.
  • If you decide to pay an allowance, include youth in the decision-making process. Discuss allowance amounts and expectations. The amount is your call, but ask for their input. One idea is to have children set aside part of their allowance for spending, part for saving, and part for sharing or charity. Clarify what you’ll pay for and what they are responsible for. For example, when you’re at the movies, maybe you agree to pay for the ticket, but the Milk Duds are on them.
  • As youth reach high-school age, reexamine the rules. Clarify what you will pay for and what your teenager is responsible for. For example, your teenage daughter may want the newest cell phone that comes with a high price tag, so establish your spending limit. If she still wants the more expensive version, have her make up the difference. Oftentimes, once the responsibility of paying for items is on the teenager, the “latest and greatest” isn’t so important.

We’re also helping youth get started with a special offer throughout this week. For all youth accounts opened from now through Saturday, April 26, we’ll deposit the first $5.00. Click here for a coupon to bring to your closest Members 1st branch. You can also download fun pages for the young person in your life and bring them to your favorite branch to help decorate it for National Credit Union Youth Week.

We’re Getting Married: Do We Need Joint Accounts?


bride & groom

Planning a wedding? Well then, you’ve got enough on your mind. But print out this article for after the vows. It’s about something you’ll need to discuss with your brand- new spouse once housekeeping begins: Do we need joint accounts?

A financial team
You are more than just roommates now; you’re a financial team. So it makes sense to combine assets and put everything in joint accounts, right? Perhaps. At least one joint account—for shared household expenses —can make sense. Both partners can contribute to the fund, either equally or on a ratio based on their earnings. Each can also maintain a separate account for personal expenses.

Maintaining a joint account can have its challenges, though —especially if each spouse is spending from it. Sharing details of every transaction is important, and having one spouse or the other in charge of “balancing the books”is a good idea. Of course, be prepared for the occasional, “Now, what is this $67 charge for?”

Joint savings and investment accounts are also a way for a couple to feel as if they are building a future together —though IRAs will remain separate, by law. Assets gained before the partners became a couple, such as inheritances, usually remain separate as well, with beneficiary designations in wills and retirement accounts easily changed to reflect the new relationship.

Dealing with debt
Debt can be another matter. Shared debt for a new sofa to replace that ragged futon is fine, but the financial baggage from the past should continue to be held separately — including such things as student loans, car loans and credit card balances. As debt is retired, new purchases can be combined for joint benefit.

It is often assumed that credit is automatically combined after marriage, but that is not necessarily the case. Separate credit cards can be maintained and paid individually, while a joint credit card can be issued for spouses to share. This is especially important if one or the other has a checkered credit history. Keeping that scarred score quarantined will allow the other partner to maintain their buying power.

Spouses are not generally responsible for the individual debts of their partner, unless payments are for “family expenses”—in that case, in some states, both spouses can be held responsible. Spousal debt can also be transferred to a marital partner in community property states.

By the numbers
In years past, it was common for married couples to enter into a total money merger upon marriage. These days, it’s more common for couples that have joint bank accounts to also maintain individual accounts. Combining assets into a joint account can allow for a higher balance, which credit unions often reward with premium perks and fee discounts.But keeping separate accounts can allow for a bit of independence.

The question of single or joint accounts —or both —may come down to a single question: Which one of you is the most adept at handling money? For some married couples, the answer can be obvious. He can’t add single-digit numbers in his head, while she can compute the tax on a purchase while reaching in her purse for the exact change.

Usually, the fewer the accounts, the fewer the fees —and perhaps the better the interest rate on deposits. And, if both spouses work, combining paychecks into joint accounts can enable a turbo-charged savings plan: pay bills with one salary; save the other.

As newlyweds, the possibilities are endless.

Note:  Members 1st FCU has partnered with GreenPath, a financial management program to help individuals and couples who may have budgeting, debt management and trouble managing their checking accounts.  In addition, stop by any branch location to pick up a copy of our brochure, “His, Hers, Mine, Ours” that offers additional insight when couples decide to marry.

 Guest Blogger: Hal Bundrick, NerdWallet

Stay on track with financing college


college kids

High school graduation is right around the corner. There’s no way your baby is old enough to be going off to college. You just waved goodbye to kindergarten and you’re dealing with the fact you really do have a child old enough to be in college. And it costs how much? What do we need to do when? What’s a parent to do?

We know there are many important steps to getting your son or daughter into school, so here’s a college preparation checklist to help keep you on track:

Now:
• Complete income tax forms as early as possible (information is needed to complete federal and state financial aid applications)
• Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and the Pennsylvania State Grant Application. The FAFSA can be completed online at www.fafsa.gov and the PA state grant application can be found at www.pheaa.org.
• If the college/university requires additional documents or applications, be sure to complete those, too. Make sure all forms are completed before each school’s deadline.
• Continue searching for scholarships now and the entire way through college.
• Plan college visits if you’re still deciding on the right school.

April through June:
• Financial aid packages/award letters and college acceptance letters will start rolling in from schools. Keep track of them and pay attention to any deadlines.
• Thoroughly review the award letters to determine how much financial aid (grants, scholarships, work-study and loans) you’ll receive and how much is still needed to bridge the gap between the cost of attendance and the amount of aid offered.
• If financial aid and college savings plans aren’t enough to cover all school-related expenses, start researching additional options (ex. monthly payment plans with the school, federal & private student loans, etc.)
• Attend one of our financial aid seminars for addition details on financing a college education. They’re scheduled for April 24, May 22 and June 26. You can register online at
www.members1st.org.
• Complete applications for student loans if necessary.
• Open a checking account and VISA® Debit Card with us for your child and set up across account transfer capability so you can transfer money from your account to your child’s account.
• Celebrate graduation with family and friends!

Not sure what do make of the entire student loan process or just need to talk to someone with some expertise? Call Tiffanie DeVan, our Specialty Loan Administrator, at (800) 283-2328, ext. 6017 or (717) 795-6017 or email devant@members1st.org.

 

Visit us at the PA Auto Show!


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Heading to the PA Auto Show at the PA Farm Show Complex this weekend? Stop by our booth (M24 in the main hall) and ask us how we may be able to help you get pre-approved for a new ride with our Auto Shopper Loan.* It’s so much easier to shop when you know what you can afford. Make sure to enter to win a snow blower and a $200 VISA® Gift Card, too!

*Rates based on model year. Lock in your rate for 90 days until  you make a decision. Ask an associate for details.

College is coming


college student

As a parent, this moment has been on your radar, but now it’s coming fast. Your baby is about to begin his or her senior year of high school. This is a very busy year and will fly by quickly. There’s much to do. That also means it’s time to start thinking about higher education opportunities and the application process. To help you and your senior, we’ve included some tips for the fall months as you move forward toward next year’s college departure.

August:

  • Request information and applications from prospective colleges, universities or technical/career schools.
  • Visit campuses to help evaluate schools.
  • Start a general search for scholarships and grants, research financial aid information from prospective schools so you’re aware of any early deadlines.
  • Attend our free Financial Aid Seminar on Thursday, August 22 from 6 to 8 pm at our Adminstrative Headquarters.

September:

  • Set a time to meet with school guidance counselors to determine college admission plans and to arrange proper testing (SAT, PSAT, ACT). Attend college fairs and meet with admission representatives to discuss career objectives and see if the school is recognized as being strong in this field.
  • Attend Financial Aid Nights offered by local high schools or Members 1st.
  • Evaluate early decision/early application admission requirements.
  • Start admission applications. You should apply to numerous schools so you have options if you are not accepted at your first choice.

October:

  • Be aware of college admission application deadlines in order to submit application materials (applications, essays, transcripts and letters of recommendation) in a timely manner.
  • Research and begin applying for private scholarships and grants. Always double check the deadlines.
  • Check with schools regarding application procedures and availability of scholarships and grants.

You can also find resources about student loans and our Student Choice Line of Credit at www.members1st.org > Products & Services > Student Services.  Our Specialty Loan Administrator, Tiffanie DeVan, is always ready to help you. You can reach her at (800) 283-2328, ext. 6017 or devant@members1st.org.

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