Archive for the ‘ Events ’ Category

Party’s On at our Mount Joy Branch


We hope to see you at our celebration event. Mark your calendars now.

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Shrewsbury Branch Grand Opening Event Slated for Saturday


We hope to see you at our celebration event on Saturday!

shrewsbury grand opening main graphicGrand Opening graphicenter to win PSU tixfind us

Shrewsbury Branch Opens August 15


We’re opening our 60th branch location on Monday, August 15 in Shrewsbury. This new branch is our 9th location in York County. Stop by to visit. Check out our special offers.

shrewbury main graphicGrand Opening graphic

enter to win PSU tix

find us

We hope to see you there.

 

Join us at this upcoming event at our Hanover Branches!


You’re invited! Stop by our Hanover Branches for these special events! The community is welcome to attend.

Hanover Event(s)

Click here for details about our North Hanover Branch. Click here for information about our South Hanover Branch.

Don’t Miss Family Fun Day at Our Camp Hill Branch!


Don’t miss this free family friendly event at our Camp Hill Branch! The community is welcome to attend.

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Click here for details about our Camp Hill Branch.

Catch the Save Wave™ During National Credit Union Youth Week!


National Credit Union Youth Week

National Credit Union Youth Week

It’s National Credit Union Youth Week! Now through Saturday (4/26), we’ll be helping our youth members Catch the Save Wave™ so they understand the importance of saving, managing money, and having a good relationship with their credit union.

Children can learn money skills as early as age three! Here are just a few tips to help young credit union surfer savers Catch the Save Wave™:

  • Have young children (preschool age) sort different types of money into piles by color and size.
  • Play grocery store or credit union/bank. Help them use a pretend cash register.
  • At the grocery store, let youth of all ages help you shop. Teach them how to comparison shop. For example, show them that for every $4.85 box of cereal, there may be similar brands on sale for half as much.
  • As youth get older, let them know what things cost. Share sales receipts for items you’ve purchased for them and for bills you’ve paid.
  • If you decide to pay an allowance, include youth in the decision-making process. Discuss allowance amounts and expectations. The amount is your call, but ask for their input. One idea is to have children set aside part of their allowance for spending, part for saving, and part for sharing or charity. Clarify what you’ll pay for and what they are responsible for. For example, when you’re at the movies, maybe you agree to pay for the ticket, but the Milk Duds are on them.
  • As youth reach high-school age, reexamine the rules. Clarify what you will pay for and what your teenager is responsible for. For example, your teenage daughter may want the newest cell phone that comes with a high price tag, so establish your spending limit. If she still wants the more expensive version, have her make up the difference. Oftentimes, once the responsibility of paying for items is on the teenager, the “latest and greatest” isn’t so important.

We’re also helping youth get started with a special offer throughout this week. For all youth accounts opened from now through Saturday, April 26, we’ll deposit the first $5.00. Click here for a coupon to bring to your closest Members 1st branch. You can also download fun pages for the young person in your life and bring them to your favorite branch to help decorate it for National Credit Union Youth Week.

We’re Getting Married: Do We Need Joint Accounts?


bride & groom

Planning a wedding? Well then, you’ve got enough on your mind. But print out this article for after the vows. It’s about something you’ll need to discuss with your brand- new spouse once housekeeping begins: Do we need joint accounts?

A financial team
You are more than just roommates now; you’re a financial team. So it makes sense to combine assets and put everything in joint accounts, right? Perhaps. At least one joint account—for shared household expenses —can make sense. Both partners can contribute to the fund, either equally or on a ratio based on their earnings. Each can also maintain a separate account for personal expenses.

Maintaining a joint account can have its challenges, though —especially if each spouse is spending from it. Sharing details of every transaction is important, and having one spouse or the other in charge of “balancing the books”is a good idea. Of course, be prepared for the occasional, “Now, what is this $67 charge for?”

Joint savings and investment accounts are also a way for a couple to feel as if they are building a future together —though IRAs will remain separate, by law. Assets gained before the partners became a couple, such as inheritances, usually remain separate as well, with beneficiary designations in wills and retirement accounts easily changed to reflect the new relationship.

Dealing with debt
Debt can be another matter. Shared debt for a new sofa to replace that ragged futon is fine, but the financial baggage from the past should continue to be held separately — including such things as student loans, car loans and credit card balances. As debt is retired, new purchases can be combined for joint benefit.

It is often assumed that credit is automatically combined after marriage, but that is not necessarily the case. Separate credit cards can be maintained and paid individually, while a joint credit card can be issued for spouses to share. This is especially important if one or the other has a checkered credit history. Keeping that scarred score quarantined will allow the other partner to maintain their buying power.

Spouses are not generally responsible for the individual debts of their partner, unless payments are for “family expenses”—in that case, in some states, both spouses can be held responsible. Spousal debt can also be transferred to a marital partner in community property states.

By the numbers
In years past, it was common for married couples to enter into a total money merger upon marriage. These days, it’s more common for couples that have joint bank accounts to also maintain individual accounts. Combining assets into a joint account can allow for a higher balance, which credit unions often reward with premium perks and fee discounts.But keeping separate accounts can allow for a bit of independence.

The question of single or joint accounts —or both —may come down to a single question: Which one of you is the most adept at handling money? For some married couples, the answer can be obvious. He can’t add single-digit numbers in his head, while she can compute the tax on a purchase while reaching in her purse for the exact change.

Usually, the fewer the accounts, the fewer the fees —and perhaps the better the interest rate on deposits. And, if both spouses work, combining paychecks into joint accounts can enable a turbo-charged savings plan: pay bills with one salary; save the other.

As newlyweds, the possibilities are endless.

Note:  Members 1st FCU has partnered with GreenPath, a financial management program to help individuals and couples who may have budgeting, debt management and trouble managing their checking accounts.  In addition, stop by any branch location to pick up a copy of our brochure, “His, Hers, Mine, Ours” that offers additional insight when couples decide to marry.

 Guest Blogger: Hal Bundrick, NerdWallet

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