Archive for the ‘ Direct Deposit ’ Category

4 Forms You’ll Fill Out at Your First Job


Nothing’s easy about finding your first job: not the internet scouring, not the resume tweaking, not the interviews. When you finally are hired, you should experience some relief — but the sheer number of things you have to learn in the first few weeks can make you feel just as harried as the search process itself.

We can’t tell you how best to do your job, but we can prime you for the paperwork. Here’s a breakdown of how to handle it.

Direct deposit forms

As soon as you can, sign up for direct deposit — an electronic transfer of your salary from your employer directly into your bank account. It might not go into effect until after your first payday, but once it does, it’ll make your life much easier. Your wages will be harder to steal, and you’ll be able to access them more quickly. Checks can take a few days to process.

Setting up direct deposit is easy: You just need your bank account number and your bank’s routing number, both of which appear on your personal checks. If your employer doesn’t have a direct deposit form, your bank can provide one.

Health insurance sign-up forms

Most people get health insurance through their employers. Those who don’t must shop for a plan through private exchanges or the public marketplaces created under President Barack Obama’s health care law — or pay a penalty for forgoing coverage.

Whichever route you take, there are a few facts and terms you should know when evaluating plans:

  • Your premium is the amount you pay for insurance. If you receive coverage through your employer, it’s usually deducted from your paycheck.
  • Your deductible is is how much you are expected to pay per year for medical services your plan covers. After you “meet your deductible,” you will only be responsible for a percentage of the cost of service, a copay or a flat fee, depending on your policy. If you have a higher deductible amount, you often have lower monthly payments and vice versa.
  • A copayment or copay is the small fee — say, $10 or $20 — you pay every time you visit the doctor, get a prescription filled or generally receive health care. These payments go toward your deductible.

There’s much more involved in choosing a health insurance plan, including understanding the alphabet soup of plan types, such as HMOs, PPOs, EPOs and POS plans. Read any plan details carefully to decide which type of insurance is best for you. (And if you’d rather stay on your parents’ health insurance plan, you can do so until you turn 26.)

Retirement and 401(k) deferral forms

You’re just starting your first job, so the time when you can stop working probably seems like it’s eons away. But now is exactly when you should start saving for your retirement.

Your employer might offer a retirement savings plan, such a 401(k), which lets you divert a portion of your pay into a tax-advantaged account. Your employer might also match some of your contribution. If you can, take advantage of the full match amount — it’s essentially free money.

Other retirement savings options include individual retirement accounts and brokerage accounts, but one thing is constant: The earlier you start saving, the more you’ll have when you retire, thanks to compounding interest.

Tax paperwork

You’ll probably notice very quickly that having a $50,000 salary doesn’t mean you’re actually taking home $50,000 per year. A portion of your check pays your federal and state taxes, as well as deductions for Social Security and Medicare.

Before you receive your first paycheck, you’ll have to fill out a W-4 form, telling your employer how much tax to withhold from it. If you’re single and have no dependents, it’s pretty straightforward. And even if not, the IRS has a helpful calculator. Depending how much you have withheld, come next April you could have a big refund coming, or you could owe the government a lot of money. If you don’t like how things shake out at tax time, you can file a new W-4.

Questions? Ask your human resources department

Just as there’s probably someone at your office who will train you and show you where the restroom is, there are probably also people who can help you make sense of all these forms — the human resources department. If you have a question about your benefits or how you get paid, talk to them. It’s their job to help, and they’ve been at it longer than you have.

Source: NerdWallet, Inc.


Members 1st is here to help you through all of life’s most important moments and milestones. If you have any questions, please call customer service at (800) 237-7288, visit our website, or visit one of our various branch locations.

Deposits On the Go – Convenience in a Snap!


mobile-deposit-baseball

How many times have you carried a check or checks around in your wallet or purse with the intent of making a deposit?  How many times have you found yourself sitting at your child’s practice, out to dinner, lying in bed, or in the shower and had that uh-oh moment?

We have an easy solution for you – no matter where you are you can make that deposit! All you need is our free, convenient mobile app!

Follow these simple steps to make a deposit now:

• Login to our Mobile App.
• Tap the camera icon/Deposit Check.
• Tap Sign Up.
• Tap Create a Deposit and select receiving account.
• Fill in the amount of check to be deposited.
• Take a photo of the front of the check and the back of the check and tap submit.

Watch how easy it is to use Mobile Deposit*:

Get our free Mobile App now:

available on app store     get it on google play

* Certain conditions apply. Account must qualify for this service. Deposit must be less than $3,000. Mobile deposits will post the same day by 8 p.m. in most cases except on weekends and holidays. Standard Internet and data use charges will apply per your individual plan. Ask your provider for details. Mobile Deposit Anytime Anywhere is currently available only on a supported Apple™ or Android™ device. Ask an associate for details.

Apple, the Apple logo, and iPhone are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.

Standard internet and data charges apply per your individual data plan. Consult your carrier for details.

Federally insured  by NCUA.

 

Why you should consider direct deposit or direct payments


lady with lap top

Are you still receiving paper checks? Do you continue to write checks to pay bills? Are those really the best, safest and reliable financial habits to have in today’s electronic world? May is Direct Deposit and Direct Payments via ACH Month. That means you can do a lot of your banking electronically  — meaning you can eliminate extra trips to your financial institution, save money on stamps and gas, and save a lot of time. It’s easy to set up and it’s convenient. It can help you avoid fees and your money is secure – it’s in your account when you need it. Payments are made on time.

Direct deposit can be used for payroll checks, Social Security payments, tax refunds and other government payments that you receive. To start direct deposit, you need to contact your employer’s payroll office or the organization from which you are receiving payments. Effective March 2013, the US Department of the Treasury requires that all federal benefits are paid electronically. For more information on this subject, visit http://www.GoDirect.org or call (800) 333-1795.

Direct payment via ACH means you make transfers or payments electronically so that you may send money where it needs to be by when it needs to be there. You never have to worry about payments getting lost or stolen in the mail. And some companies offer incentives when you sign up for automatic payments.

If you’re not banking electronically, give it some consideration. You’ll save time and be amazed at how convenient it is. Not only that, but you’ll help the environment as well by eliminating additional paper waste.

Go Direct with Electronic Deposits


Are you still receiving a federal benefit payment by paper check? If you are, the U.S. Department of the Treasury is requiring you to switch to electronic payments by March 1, 2013. This includes federal benefits such as Social Security.

Why is direct deposit safe?

  • Checks can get lost or stolen – but with direct deposit you get your money on time, every time. Direct deposit eliminates the risk of stolen checks and forged signatures which helps protect you from identity theft.
  • It’s easier. You don’t have to leave home to cash or deposit your check – your money is always in your account on payment day.
  • It gives you more control. Your check doesn’t rule your schedule. Payments arrive at the same time each month – your money is there when you need it.
  • What do you need to know to sign up for direct deposit?

  • Your Social Security Number
  • Members 1st FCU routing number: 231382241
  • Your account number
  • Amount of your last federal benefit check
  • Check number from a recent federal benefit payment or claim numbers from the paying agency
  • How to switch your federal benefit payments to direct deposit:

  • Sign up online at Go Direct
  • Visit one of our convenient branch locations
  • Call TeleBranch (Customer Service) at (800) 237-7288
  • Call the Go Direct helpline at (800) 333-1795
  • The Go Direct campaign is sponsored by the U.S. Department of the Treasury and Federal Reserve Banks.

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